Reader’s Letter: The definition of an Anguillan

POSTED: 07/20/11 11:44 AM

Dear Editor,

As a man of my word that continues to educate people base on facts this is fromWikipedia, the online encyclopedia explain about belonger status.

Belonger status is a legal classification normally associated with British overseas territories. It refers to people who have close ties to a specific territory, normally by birth and/or ancestry. The requirements for belonger status, and the rights that it confers, vary from territory to territory. The rights associated with belonger status normally include the right to vote, to hold elected office, to own real property without the necessity for a license, to reside in that territory without immigration restrictions, and to freely accept employment without the requirement of a work permit. In general, to be born with belonger status a person must be born in a territory to a parent who holds belonger status.

I here present proof of our sister Caribbean island of Anguilla, where they define who is an Anguillan. http://www.gov.ai/documents/Anguilla%20Constitution%20Draft%202009.pdf . Chapter 11 part 105. It goes as follow defining who is an Anguillan.

Belonger Status

105. (1) There shall be an Anguillan Belonger Status Commission (hereinafter referred to as the Commission) the composition and function of which shall, subject to the provision of this section be prescribed by law.

(2) For the purposes of this Constitution a person shall be regarded as belonging to Anguilla if that person-

(a) is born in Anguilla and at the time of the birth his father or mother is or was a British Overseas Territories Citizen (or a British Dependent Territories Citizen, Citizen of The United Kingdom and Colonies or British Subject) by virtue of birth, registration or naturalization in Anguilla or by virtue of descent from a father or mother who was born in Anguilla;

(b) is born outside Anguilla of a father or mother who is a British Overseas Territories Citizen (or a British Dependent Territories Citizen, Citizen of The United Kingdom and Colonies or British Subject) by virtue of birth in Anguilla or descent or who belongs to Anguilla by virtue of birth in Anguilla or descent;

(c) is a person born in or outside of Anguilla with a grandparent who was born in Anguilla and who belongs to Anguilla by birth or descent or who, if deceased, would if alive, so belong to Anguilla; or

(d) is a child adopted in Anguilla by a person who belongs to Anguilla by birth or descent;

(e) is domicile in Anguilla, has been ordinarily resident in Anguilla for not less than 15 years, and has been granted belonger status by the Commission; Such a person must apply to the Anguilla Belonger Status Commission for a grant of Anguillian belonger status, which grant may be withdrawn at any time on conviction of an indictable offence.

(f) is a person who is married to a belonger for a period of not less than 7 years. Such person must apply to the Anguilla Belonger Status Commission for a grant of belonger status, which grant may be withdrawn at any time on conviction of an indictable offence,

(g) was born outside Anguilla and has satisfied the Commission that his father or mother was born in Anguilla and is regarded (or if deceased, would if alive be regarded) as belonging to Anguilla by virtue of this subsection;

(h) a person with a great-grandparent who was born in Anguilla and who is regarded as being a belonger by virtue of this or any previous Constitution, provided that person has been living (i.e. physically present) in Anguilla for a continuous period of 5 years and his absences from Anguilla do not exceed a total of ninety (90) days in each of those years, save for good and sufficient cause. Such a person must apply to the Belonger Status Commission for a grant of belonger status, which grant may be withdrawn at any time on conviction of an indictable offence.

(3) An application for belonger status under subsection (2) (e) (f) (g) and (h) of this section may be refused in any case in which the Commission is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds for refusing the application in the interests of defense, public safety, public morality or public order.

(4) There shall be such provision as may be made by the Legislature for depriving of his citizenship any person who is a citizen by virtue of registration if such registration as a citizen was obtained by false representation or fraud or willful concealment of material facts or if he is convicted in Anguilla of an indictable offence.

Provided that any law enacted for the purposes of paragraph 4 of this subsection shall include provisions under which the person concerned shall have a right of appeal to a court of competent jurisdiction or other independent authority and shall be permitted to have legal representation of his own choice.

This is a government that loves and protects its people, and this country is a dependency of the United Kingdom. We must conclude that the United Kingdom is not practicing discrimination. How much more importance that the native St. Maarten people who is on the verge of extinction be recognized in St. Maarten constitution? People let your conscience be your guide.

Yours truly

Miguel Arrindell

The Patriot

 

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